How To Make A Paper Plate Ladybird

How To Make A Paper Plate Ladybird

With Summer nearly here, we have been looking towards our garden for inspiration for our craft projects. As we work through my challenge of 50 Crafts to Try Before You’re 10, we have been looking at lots of different paper plate animal crafts. Oliver still loves his paper plate Bumble Bee we made a few years ago, so we decided this time to try our hand at a Paper Plate Ladybird.

The beauty of paper plate crafts, is they require very little in the way of materials. Lets face it, most of us have the odd spare paper plate kicking around from the last kids party! That and a bit of paint and you can create anything….. well almost.

So if you would like to see how we made our Paper Plate Ladybird, read on for the full tutorial, or pin it for later!

Pin How to Make a Paper Plate Ladybird for Later!

How to Make a Paper Plate Ladybird Craft pin

What You Will Need

  • 3 paper plates
  • Black and red poster paint
  • Paintbrushes
  • Scissors
  • Glue
  • Hole punch
  • Split pin
  • Black marker/felt pen
  • Pair of googley eyes
  • 1 black pipe cleaner

How You Make Your Paper Plate Ladybird

  • First you need to paint the paper plates. One of the plates should be painted red on the back, one should be painted black on the back, and lastly the 3rd plate should be painted black just in the middle.
Oliver painting paper plates
  • Leave the plates to dry completely, then cut out the middle painted part of the third paper plate. Depending on the age of your child, it might be best if an adult does this part.
  • Cut the red plate in half down the middle to form the wings.
Painted paper plates drying
Inner circle of one paper plate cut out. Red paper plate cut in half.
  • Stick the ladybird’s ‘head’ on by sticking the smaller painted black circle to the underneath side of the black painted plate.
The 'head' of the ladybird is stuck onto the black paper plate 'body'.
  • Draw circles on your wings with a black marker pen and colour them in. I drew around a 2p coin for Oliver to then colour in, which made it easier for him.
Oliver colouring in the paper plate ladybird spots
  • Using a hole punch, punch a hole at the top of both wings and in the black paper plate in the middle of the neck. If you do not have a single hole punch to do this, then you will need to punch your holes before sticking the head to the body.
  • Use a split pin to attach the wings to the ladybird’s body, and glue on a pair of googley eyes. to the head.
paper plate ladybird nearly assembled
  • Lastly, cut a black pipe cleaner in half and twist each half around a pencil or pen to make two antennae. Attach to the head with glue, and leave to dry.

That’s it, our Paper Plate Ladybird. What do you think?

If you need some more inspiration for paper plate crafts then check out our recent round up Paper Plate Animals post, or take a look and follow our Pinterest board.

Kerry x

50 Crafts to Try Before You’re 10!

This is one of the crafts on our free open ended challenge: “50 Crafts to Try Before You’re 10!

Designed to help you inject some creativity into every day family life. Signing up means you get a downloadable checklist, access to a supportive Facebook group, competitions along the way and a certificate and pin badge for all of those that complete it! Come and join in the fun!

4 Comments

  1. June 8, 2019 / 6:47 am

    I love this, such a simple but effective craft. I remember making paper plate ladybirds when my girls were smaller – although we just did a simpler one with one single paper plate. Will have to try this one with Thomas when he gets big enough for some crafting. #KidsandKreativity

  2. June 11, 2019 / 7:21 pm

    This idea is so simple but so effective, I love it! It’s one of those activities that once you’ve got the base of the idea you can really go wild with the things you could make! #kidsandkreativity

  3. June 14, 2019 / 9:21 am

    Great little craft project! Paper plates are so versatile aren’t they? Fab for #30dayswild too #KidsandKreativity

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