Raspberry and Coconut Marshmallow Hearts

Raspberry and Coconut Marshmallow Hearts

I have recently discovered the art of making marshmallows and these Raspberry and Coconut Marshmallow Hearts are the perfect treat to whip up with the kids this Valentine’s Day.

This recipe was inspired by the mallow biscuits I enjoyed as a child (I can’t remember the name of them). You know the ones, they had two rows of marshmallow, with raspberry jam down the centre and were sprinkled with dessicated coconut.

I recently rediscovered a recipe book that I had bought years ago, Marshmallow Magic by Genevieve Taylor. It’s full of lovely marshmallow recipes, with lots of lovely pictures and plenty of inspiration for mallow creations.

Me and Oliver set to work in the kitchen and tried out the Classic Vanilla Marshmallow recipe in the book. We had lots of fun doing it, but boy is homemade marshmallow sticky! And burnt sugar syrup is not easy to clean up!

After several attempts we had cracked it, and I was desperate to try and recreate the taste of those mallow biscuits I had as a kid. So with some adaptations, and several (5 to be precise!) further attempts and experiments, we came up with our adapted recipe to create these scrumptious Raspberry and Coconut Marshmallow Hearts. A perfect sweet treat and great fun to do with the kids.

So if you would like to see how we made our Raspberry and Coconut Marshmallow Hearts read on, or pin it for later!

Pin ‘Raspberry and Coconut Marshmallow Hearts’ for later!

Raspberry and Coconut Marshmallow Hearts

Ingredients

  • 2 egg whites
  • 8 leaves of gelatin (I used a 13g pack of Dr. Oetker Leaf Gelatine)
  • 250ml water
  • 500g granulated sugar
  • 1 tsp raspberry flavouring
  • Pink food colouring (optional)
  • Granulated coconut
  • A little vegtable oil
  • Icing sugar (for dusting)

How You Make Raspberry and Coconut Marshmallow Hearts

  1. First in a stand mixer beat the 2 egg whites until they form stiff peaks. Add your flavouring and food colouring, but don’t mix it in just yet.
  2. Soak the gelatine sheets in a shallow bowl of water for at least 5 minutes.
  3. Add the water and granulated sugar to a saucepan, and heat on a low heat, stirring frequently, until all the sugar is dissolved.
  4. Increase the heat, and let the sugar syrup bubble away for about 10 minutes. A sugar thermometer is almost essential at this stage, and helps prevent you over boilng it (or you end up with toffee!). When it reaches 120C it’s ready. Don’t let it cool down and reheat as it will cause the sugar to granulate.
  5. Turn the mixer back on to a low, and slowly pour in the hot sugar syrup with the mixer running. Squeeze the excess water from the gelatine sheets and add to the mixer one by one, then turn it onto a high setting.
  6. Whisk the mixture on a high speed for about 7 minutes. Whilst waiting prepare a baking tin by greasing it with vegetable oil and sprinkle with a dusting of icing sugar.
  7. When ready the resulting marshmallow mixture should be smooth and shiny and very sticky. Pour it into the prepared tin and smooth the surface with spatula. Dust the top with more icing sugar and leave to set.
  8. After about 4 hours the marshmallow mixture should be set. You can then cut out heart shapes using a heart shaped cookie cutter.
  9. Dip the edges of the cut marshmallow hearts in a bowl of dessicated coconut, and that’s it, you’re done!
Raspberry and Coconut Marshmallow Hearts

These honestly were soooo good! And the flavour combination was perfect, taking me back down memory lane.

You can also try other flavourings: vanilla, cherry and strawberry would all work as well, and what not try different sprinkles on the edges like grated chocolate, sugar strands or hundred and thousands?

If you would like more inspiration for sweet treats to make with your kids, then check out and follow our Pinterest board

So what do you think? Have you made marshmallows from scratch before? I’d love to hear what you’ve made if you have in the comments, and what flavour combinations you came up with.

Kerry x

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